Home » Strategic Communication » Choose Your Track, Part II: Strategic Communication

Choose Your Track, Part II: Strategic Communication

(Note: Last month, we posted the first of a two-part blog series on the ASP Study Tracks. Read about the Public Policy Track here. Continue to read below for the second post of the series.)

Students in the Strategic Communication Track are on the forefront of the converging fields of public relations and marketing communication. In addition to discussion-style class lectures, our students gain first-hand experience through DC-based fieldwork activities and client work. We compare how different types of national organizations— such as private companies, global non-profits, government agencies, and congressional offices— develop strategic goals and objectives, choose appropriate communication channels and tactics, and measure the impact of their work.

StratComm at WP 3

Students directly engage with these organizations and the communication professionals who work in them to gain first-hand exposure to the best communication practices through formative research, strategic planning, message formation and storytelling, and more. Students explore these learning objectives further in their communications internships. Recent internship sites have included multiple House and Senate offices, The ONE Campaign, the Clapham Group, National Immigration Forum, the Borenstein Group, the American Enterprise Institute, Philanthropy Magazine, and even the business development department of the Washington Redskins!

StratComm Presentations

Group presentations on how a client organization could effectively respond to a possible crisis scenario.

In our “Advocacy and Development” course, we work collaboratively in small teams for a real-world client to research and propose a communications plan. Previous clients have included Bread for the World and the Accord Network. In “Case Studies in Strategic Communication,” students design two graduate school-style case studies, both supported by original interviews and research. This semester, the first case study—a group exercise— focused on the immigration debate in light of the 2016 Presidential Election. By interviewing four different organizations who are stakeholders in this issue, we compared how different organizations practice strategic communication in a crisis and the processes they use to document and respond to lessons learned from the experience. In our second case study—an individual project— each student focuses on a specific communication situation at their internship office or organization.

StratComm at HT 2

The students hear from the public relations and social media team at Honest Tea.

In addition to our communication proposals and case studies, we also discuss and explore how biblical teachings inform our use of strategic communication, primarily through conversations with Christian professionals who excel both in the quality of their work and in the “faithful practice” of their jobs.

If you are a major in Communication, Public Relations, Business Administration, International Business, or Marketing, we encourage you to consider joining this study track! To learn more, click here.

StratComm at WP 4

The Strategic Communication students met Austin Graff (front right), a Talent Acquisition & Branding Specialist at The Washington Post.

See below for more pictures of the Strategic Communication Track at work, both in the classroom and in the field.

IMG_6675.JPG

The Strategic Communication Track joins the Public Policy students for a briefing at the National Transportation Safety Board.

Sharlene Oong, ICS presentation

Sharlene Oong (Messiah College) presents her research on a communication plan used by her internship site, The Clapham Group.

IMG_20170210_093948229_HDR

For more information on the immigration debate, the students hear from Dr. Mark Hugo Lopez, Director of Hispanic Research at the Pew Research Center.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s