Internship Spotlight I {Fall 2017}

Rebekah Mauer, Whitworth University

Rebekah Mauer internship

With previous experience in a family law practice, Rebekah was looking forward to exploring a new legal field at the DOJ’s Criminal Division. 

I am excited to be interning at the Department of Justice, specifically in the Human Rights Special Prosecution (HRSP) section of the Criminal Division. As an undergraduate student, most of my tasks are researching historical events (rather than law and statutes as a legal intern would). Nonetheless, this does not make my work any less interesting!

I was worried that my job would be like your stereotypical internship– fetching coffee and doing lunch runs– it has been anything but! My tasks have varied from sitting in the Library of Congress’ reading room to conducting in depth online searches, all of which aid in the prosecution of international human rights violations.

Day to day, I speak with attorneys, historians, librarians, linguists, and specialists in fields that I did not even know existed before I started at HRSP. I have been so blessed with this opportunity and would encourage any future ASP’ers to apply!

 

Shelby Baumgartner, Biola University

Shelby Baumgartner internship

Shelby at a rally organized by her internship site, the Feminist Majority Foundation.

This semester, I am interning with the Feminist Majority Foundation (FMF), an organization focused on advocating for the empowerment of women through research and activism. My specific departments at FMF are Policy Research and Development and our Feminist Campus program, but all the interns do a little bit of everything around the office. A typical day for me at FMF includes doing research, prepping tweets for the Feminist Campus twitter, writing news stories or blog posts for the various FMF platforms, and attending rallies throughout DC.

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I started my internship, but it has been such a growing experience for me. FMF is an intergenerational organization– our founder has been at the forefront of the women’s rights movement since the 1960’s and she works alongside women just out of college and with mothers of school-age children. Being in an environment where I am surrounded by so many women at different points in their careers has been a very formative experience for me. Every day is a reminder that it is okay to not know exactly where I am headed, that I am figuring it out as I go, and that I am fighting for the things I believe in the process.

 

Ian Snively, George Fox University

Ian Snively internship

Ian is able to combine both of his passions– political science and journalism– at the Heritage Foundation’s Daily Signal.

I am interning with the Daily Signal, the multimedia news arm of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think-tank that produces and promotes research on key policy issues. My primary daily tasks are conducting interviews and writing articles on a variety of topics, from politics to natural disasters.

In my time with the Daily Signal, I’ve not only expanded my knowledge of current political issues, but I am also growing in my understanding of public policy from a conservative perspective. I am meeting and speaking with politicians, listening to lectures from policy analysts, and fine-tuning my skills in research and writing. There are so many great learning opportunities and resources you can obtain from working at a think-tank, and there are hundreds in the city from across the political spectrum.

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Want to have your own D.C. internship experience? Click here to start an application!

Internship Spotlight II {Spring 2017}

Andrew Ramirez, Olivet Nazarene University

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Andrew is pursuing his passion for federal law enforcement with an internship at the U.S. Department of Treasury. 

I have the honor of interning in the Office of Enterprise Business Solutions (EBS) at the U.S. Department of Treasury. This office deals with the creation of website products, development, and data analytics. Because of the sensitive nature of my work, I actually can’t share specific details about it with anyone outside of my department! But I can say this— I am learning how to balance a serious workload and how to perform under the pressure of the professional world. Two highlights of my internship have been: First, I get to regularly meet with high-ranking officials from all across the Treasury, including individuals in financial crimes and terrorism; I even met the Secretary of the Treasury and shook his hand! Second, as an intern at the Treasury Department, I have access to the Main Treasury building which means I get to walk the historic golden hall where Hamilton once walked (presumably) and I get to be surrounded everyday by the amazing history of our country at work. And if those weren’t enough, I also have access to the west side of the White House and can walk that side of the lawn in the morning before work!

Mariana Diaz, Fresno Pacific University

Mariana Diaz, NIF

Mariana (left) enjoys hands-on experience with immigration advocacy at the NIF.

This semester, I am interning at the National Immigration Forum. The Forum advocates for the value of immigrants and immigration to our nation. Their work is centered on immigration reform, integration and citizenship, and state and local developments. I specifically work with the Fields and Constituencies team, where we analyze how immigration is taking place around the country. For our weekly newsletters, I research stories of immigrants who are being affected by the recent executive orders. In addition, I am in charge of posting to the Twitter account of G92, an initiative to inform college-age students and young adults about immigration. I also attend meetings with our partners and briefings on the Hill. My tasks vary every day and I am always learning. I am very thankful for this experience and it has definitely reassured me that advocacy in immigration is a career I want to pursue.

Randy Lohman, Messiah College

Randy Lohman, Rep. Barletta's Office

Randy stands with his member, Congressman Lou Barletta (PA-11) in the Rayburn House Office Building.

I have the amazing opportunity of interning in the office of Congressman Lou Barletta (PA-11). I am experiencing first-hand the daily operations of a Congressional office. On a regular basis, I work on projects for staff members, communicate with our constituents, and attend hearings—one I specifically enjoyed was a subcommittee hearing on religious liberty. I have also been trained to lead constituents on tours of the Capitol building. One time, during a tour, I was able to see Vice President Mike Pence walk through the Capitol on his way to a luncheon. Every day, I work with the staffers of Congressman Barletta’s office to help make the office operate smoothly so that we can best serve our constituents.

Internship Spotlight I {Spring 2017}

Rolaine Castro, Fresno Pacific University

rolaine-castro-us-commission-on-civil-rights

With a passion for civil rights, Rolaine feels right at home with her internship.

This semester, I am interning for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Our office is a federal organization that is in charge of investigating civil rights issues. I work with civil rights analysts, and we are currently evaluating the effect that excessive municipal court fines and fees have on the poor and minority population. The office is also preparing for the big Statutory Enforcement Briefing that will take place in a few weeks; this is when the commissioners will evaluate the Department of Justice and their progress toward providing a remedy for the excessive fines and fees. I have always had an interest in our criminal justice system and a passion for civil rights issues, so getting to work in an office where both are the primary areas of focus is like a dream come true.

Carlye Poff, Wheaton College

I have the pleasure of interning this semester with Jubilee USA, an economic justice non-profit organization. Every morning, as I walk up the street to work, I get a full view of the Capitol building at the end of the street. The internship has been the perfect mix of faith-based non-profit work and politics. I am one of four interns in a small office of only three permanent staff members, so everyone knows everyone well.  It is a friendly environment where I am able to develop my professional skills while also getting to know people who have worked in the non-profit world for many years. So far, I have lobbied in the Senate buildings, researched advocacy issues, attended meetings with Jubilee’s partners, and participated in conference calls, and wrote/edited informational documents for Jubilee’s supporters.

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Carlye’s office is located inside a Lutheran church on the famous East Capitol Street.

Rachel Pelletier, Malone University

rachel-pelletier-senator-browns-office

Rachel (second from right) and the rest of the office interns stand with CNN Commentator Van Jones (third from right).

My internship with the office of Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) has been everything I had hoped it would be.  My responsibilities as an intern vary each week. I often interact with Ohio constituents in different ways, whether that means speaking to them over the phone regarding their concerns or guiding them around the Capitol Building for a tour. I’ve also attended Congressional briefings on topics ranging from child welfare to an Advancing Rare Disease Treatment/Health Care Reform briefing. One of my most memorable briefings was the Russian Intelligence Committee Hearing, which featured testimony by then-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, then-CIA Director John Brennan, NSA Director Admiral Michael Rogers, and FBI Director James Comey. My office staff has made every effort to invest in each intern. We are encouraged and given opportunities that will enhance our experience and contribute to our professional development. Senator Brown has personally taken the time to meet and speak with us. Every Monday and Friday, our office sets up a lunch between one staff member and the interns, which allows us to get to know them and ask questions. I feel blessed to have been given this experience as it has pushed me to grow as an individual and a professional! An internship on the Hill, specifically within a Senate office, is worth considering!

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Want to have your own D.C. internship experience? Click here to start an application!

 

 

Internship Spotlight II {Spring 2016}

Courtney Selle, Taylor University

Courtney Selle internshipI am currently interning with the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee under the office of the chairman, Senator Lamar Alexander. In this internship, I am specifically working in the education office; however, I also assist with the other areas: health, labor and pensions, as well as work on tasks for the personal office. On a day-to-day basis, I will research the daily news on education and labor issues, attend professional development courses, take notes at a briefing, sit in on staff meetings, and take a few phone calls.

I took this internship without knowing the specific details of what I would be doing, but I can say that the internship definitely has helped prepare me for a future career in education policy. Not only am I learning a wealth of knowledge on education policy and how the policy process works, but I am also meeting highly connected people who have advocated on my behalf as I look to find a job after I graduate at the end of this program. Furthermore the office culture has been counter to what I expected. I was expecting a cutthroat office environment where you are constantly critiqued and people are stomping on their colleagues to get ahead — NOT TRUE! Don’t believe everything you see on T.V. Instead I am constantly thanked for the most menial tasks, even when I do them wrong, and people have been so willing to lend their help to others and myself. I have truly enjoyed my internship and am thankful for the opportunity. If there are any future ASPers who want to intern on the Hill but who are more interested in policy work than constituent work, I would recommend that that to try to intern for a committee!

Ashley Bloemhof, Dordt College

Ashley Bloemhof internshipAs an intern at the American Conservative, I recently had the opportunity to work as a credentialed media reporter at CPAC 2016, the largest Republican conference in the nation. Suits and stilettos crowded the Potomac Ballroom at the Gaylord National Harbor Hotel in Maryland, and though the organized chaos may have driven others mad, I could not have been happier to rub shoulders with exceptional writers and photographers. The experience opened my eyes to the daily routine of a journalist and furthered my understanding about what it means to write, and write well, to meet a deadline. Though thoroughly exhausted the week after, I feel incredibly blessed not only as a writer but as a believer as well. In the midst of an election season, it becomes all too easy to settle back into complacency and whine about the current state of our union. However, though the presentations of CPAC speakers and panelists undoubtedly contained rhetoric purposed solely to “rally the troops,” I truly do believe that there are honest, hardworking individuals in the legislature. I will not take for granted the lessons I learned this weekend and hope to continue building on them each and every day.

Internship Spotlight I {Spring 2016}

Hannah Scheenstra, Vanguard University of Southern California

Hannah ScheenstraThis semester, I am interning on Capitol Hill with the House Armed Services Committee (HASC). I have the utmost respect for our men and women in uniform, and their willingness to make the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom has triggered my interest in military affairs. Having my brother in the military also opened my mind up to the life of a soldier and, therefore, encouraged me to pursue this opportunity to extend my knowledge on national security and defense issues.

Being the largest committee in the House of Representatives, HASC holds 63 members and an equally large staff. I get the opportunity to pick which issues interest me the most and reach out to the clerks or professional staff members to offer my help. Whether it be a hearing on emerging worldwide threats or just managing phones at the front desk, I continue to learn something new everyday. The work that I do in the office varies week to week. I assist with both full committee and subcommittee hearings, assist with briefings, and help with various projects related to the defense budget. Everyday I get to meet important military personnel and interact with multiple congressman and their staffers. At this point, I have lost track of how many different people I meet on a daily basis! Probably the coolest thing that has happened so far is seeing both the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State.

Needless to say, I am immensely grateful that I have the privilege to intern with this committee, even if it is just for 4 months. I have learned so much and I have seen myself grow in more ways than one.

Patrick Hubbard, Taylor University

I am spending this semester interning for the Clapham Group, a creative consulting firm out in Virginia. This organization does work for a diverse array of clients, and I have been able to work on several projects aimed at connecting people of faith with organizations related to social justice. My first few weeks were spent doing research to develop a new nonprofit through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, one that would connect millennials of faith to international organizations doing ministry in the fields of development and public health. Through this project, I was given the opportunity to see what goes into the development of new organizations, and how international development must be approached from an organizational standpoint.

Another project in which I got to participate was focused on the racial and economic inequalities that affect educational opportunity across the United States. I attended a collective action meeting hosted by the Expectations Project (a D.C.-based education advocacy organization) and attended by representatives from the National Association of Evangelicals, Sojourners Magazine, World Vision, and the Center for Public Justice, among many others. At this convention, I was able to see power actually being exercised for positive change and was astounded that what I witnessed was actually something that could make a real difference in the lives of those who are discriminated against and unfairly disadvantaged. Through these two projects, I have learned much about the ways that Christians can utilize their social and political capital for good in the lives of others, both worldwide and domestically. I have been inspired by seeing strong Christians use their positions of power to effect real change and am thrilled that my own research and support can aid these efforts in some small way.

Internship Spotlight II {Fall 2015}

Kathryn Hopper, Westmont College

Kathryn Hopper internshipThis semester I have had the privilege of interning for Congressman Devin Nunes (CA-22). As a local from the district he represents, the office has been a nice taste of home even though I am living on the opposite side of the country. My role in the office gives me several opportunities to interact with constituents, either on the phone listening to their concerns or in person when I get to take those visiting on a tour of the Capitol. The last couple of months have flown by, and I am incredibly blessed to have had so many wonderful experiences thus far. Last week I attended a hearing when former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testified before the House Select Committee on Benghazi. I also had the chance to see the Pope during his first visit to Washington D.C., to watch as Paul Ryan was sworn in as the new Speaker of the House, and to be present for several major votes on legislation addressing the budget, defunding Planned Parenthood, and reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank. I have thoroughly enjoyed having a front row seat to history in just the handful of weeks I have been on the Hill.

Victoria Goebel, Gordon College

2015-09-14 19.21.29 - CopyThis semester I am interning at the Borenstein Group in Fairfax, VA. BG is an integrated marketing agency that works with PR, advertising, branding, and digital strategy. The work mostly focuses on business-to-business and business-to-government companies in tech, security, and intelligence. Since starting in September, I have had the chance to experience all parts of agency life.

The Borenstein Group is a small firm, and this has given me the chance to have plenty of hands-on experience. I have worked on research, planning, social media, and a variety of projects. This internship has given me the opportunity to learn about industries I did not know much about and discover the world of government contractors.

My favorite part of the internship experience is applying 3 years of classroom learning to a real-life setting. It has been rewarding to see how lessons learned in the classroom apply to the work force. I definitely have developed a better appreciation for the ways in which Gordon has prepared me for this opportunity.

Internship Spotlight I {Fall 2015}

Fall 2015 students just finished the third week of their internships! Three students took a few moments to report on what they’re doing and what they’ve learned.

Jennifer Mayorga, University of Northwestern – St. Paul

Jennifer1I am the Immigration Policy Project Intern at the National Conference of State Legislatures. My internship has offered me an opportunity to reconnect with my first policy love: immigration. Coming from an immigrant family and recognizing all the issues related to our broken immigration system, I knew I had to come to Washington D.C. to learn about and get up to date on what our government is doing. My internship supervisor has allowed me the opportunity to attend a variety of hearings and briefings that expose me to the key players in the immigration debate.

My most recent project didn’t actually have to do with the type of immigration issues I grew up with but with the refugee crisis that has turned into a hot topic in Congress. I spent two weeks researching every website on refugee resettlement and reading reports from a variety of organizations and government offices. My supervisor asked me to create a fact sheet that she could take to informational sessions with legislators and governors. I was intimidated by the caliber of writing I was expected to produce! I had the incredible opportunity to attend the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Syrian Refugee Crisis. I saw my own senators advocate for more refugees and use our state as an example of a welcoming community. I saw my government, my democracy in action that day, and I think that is what has made my internship such a valuable experience for me. The opportunity to research and write and truly understand the barriers we face when creating public policy has been one of the biggest lessons I have learned during my short time at NCSL.

Eric Hensel, Gordon College

Eric1This semester in D.C., I’m interning in the office of Senator Kelly Ayotte of NH. This past summer, I interned in the senator’s state office and absolutely loved it. I definitely made the right decision to intern for her in D.C. There’s something special about the Hill. The atmosphere is intense, fast paced, and invigorating. The other day I was walking through the Capitol and passed John McCain — no big deal. Everywhere you turn, there is someone who has a hand in shaping the policy of the free world. It’s both incredibly intimidating and incredibly exhilarating all at once. I’ve gotten to do some amazing work in the area of defense while in Senator Ayotte’s office. As I’ve spent time preparing for briefings, I’ve found out firsthand not only that congressional staffers are mind-blowingly brilliant, but also that the issues they work on are really interesting!

My favorite moment of my internship so far happened a few days ago. I got a chance, near the end of the day, just to explore the Capitol all by myself. I made my way to the rotunda and found myself all alone. It was intensely quiet, and I was floored by a realization. Here I was, all alone, in the Capitol dome of the United States of America, the most powerful nation on earth. It was beyond amazing to truly take in the rotunda, really examine the paintings, and just marvel at where I was. There’s something intensely beautiful about the quiet Capitol, and I was incredibly fortunate enough to wander into it. That’s the great thing about D.C. and ASP: you’ll stumble into a phenomenal experience right when you weren’t expecting it.

Brandan Wilchcombe, Taylor University

Brandan1I am originally from the Bahamas, and now I live in Indiana and attend Taylor University. I never thought I would actually be here in Washington D.C., interning for the Washington Redskins Business Development and Operations Department, but I am, and it is awesome. At the games, I assist with handing out the field passes, and sometimes I walk the clients down to the field or take them into the tunnel access area. I also shadow my supervisor while he checks the suites. During the Redskins’ season opener against the Dolphins, I got to meet the Governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe and take a picture with him. When we went into our suite to watch the rest of the game, I met former NBA player Marcus Camby and actor Colton Haynes. Serena Williams was even there! This was a great start to my job, but besides working games, I also have office work. My tasks include entering and updating client information in our CRM, doing research, writing biographies for clients, and reaching out to clients about invitations. While I work, players from the team often walk by! At first it was shocking to see Robert Griffin III walking past, but now it just seems like a normal day. So far my internship has been great. I am really working hard, but there is still more I need to learn before I am done. I am really thankful for my supervisor because he is teaching me a lot. He is very determined and hard-working and does his best to make sure everything is done right.

Besides my internship, I am really enjoying this time working with my team in the Communications track. We are working hard and doing our best to complete our case studies and client work. ASP is a really good program, especially for new experiences and opportunities.

Internship Spotlight II {Spring 2015}

ev (1)Tim Carr, Gordon College

This semester, I am interning in the Crime Scene Investigations Division of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department. My main duties include assisting with Crime Report records and also assisting crime scene detectives on scene and in the office. I am learning about many different facets of the police department.  Every day I am doing something different.

One of the most “fun” things that I have done was going to a homicide investigation and getting firsthand experience at processing a crime scene. Other days, I have had the opportunity to go to the D.C. Superior Court and sit in on casesev, which proves to be both interesting and a great learning experience. My internship is in many ways indescribable–in some cases because I am not allowed to talk about all of it but also because this is a once in a lifetime experience that I will never forget. The impact that the officers and leadership have made on me will be lifelong.  My future career as a law enforcement official will be bettered because of my experience here this spring.

IMG_6666Alexcis Albert, Vanguard University of Southern California

I am an executive intern at the State of Florida’s Office in the Hall of States Building of Washington D.C. The Executive Office of Florida is a very interesting and busy office where we are the liaison between the federal government and Florida state government. Part of my responsibilities includes correspondence and research for the members in my office who represent the Governor of Florida. The nature of my work is communicating with the Florida congressional delegation and attending hearings pertaining to Floridian issues such as Cuba, Immigration, Education, Healthcare, and Veterans Affairs. My time hereIMG_7017 has been wonderful! My office has given me the freedom to work on issues that are of interest to me, and being able to see senators and representatives who work on issues important to the entire nation has been fascinating and humbling. The most exciting event of my internship was being able to meet Governor Scott of Florida; it was definitely a moment I will carry with me for years to come!

Internship Spotlights I {Spring 2015}

The Spring 2015 semester is flying by as students go to their internships and work on their group projects.  Three students took a few moments to report on how their internships are going.

Conference room mural at the Institute for Policy Studies

Conference room mural at the Institute for Policy Studies

Christina McIntyre, Messiah College

I’m a poverty policy intern at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS). IPS is an activist-oriented think tank of public scholars. Over the past few weeks at IPS, I’ve been learning what it means to be a public scholar: to use research for social change. It’s public service through grassroots, academic, and institutional activism. My research at IPS focuses on economic hardship in the U.S. I’ve written about education inequalities, homelessness, and economic segregation. Currently, I’m helping to coordinate advocacy between Maryland and D.C. lawmakers for criminal justice reform. My internship at IPS has taken me all over the city to hearings on the Hill, meetings with activists at Busboys and Poets, and presentations by Brookings, New America, and other think tanks. Interning in D.C. is an incredible opportunity to engage the issues and ideas I care most about.

albertoAlberto Sanchez, Fresno Pacific University

My name is Alberto Sanchez, and I am currently interning for Senator Johnson’s office. I do a lot of different things in the office. I am slowly becoming accustomed to the internship routine. Every morning, I prepare newspapers for every staff member; I also sort mail appropriately as it comes in. The tasks that I do can seem dull; however, I like to think that I am contributing by serving the American people. There have been a lot of interesting experiences that I have had thus far. For example, the other day I met with my chief of staff. He said that interns are just as important as a chief of staff or legislative aid; he told me that interns deserve respect.  I was proud after the conversation that I had with him. I learned that interns are very important contributors to the welfare of the nation. I also enjoy giving tours of the Capitol. The Capitol is majestically beautiful from the inside. I am very happy that I have the opportunity to intern on the Hill. Lastly, the staff members at Senator Johnson’s office are very nice and cordial. They have told me that I can talk to them whenever I want about anything relating to their field of expertise. Furthermore, I have attended committee hearings that have expanded my knowledge of issues such as immigration, foreign relations, and national security. Clearly, I am learning about the importance of the United States Senate and how interns contribute to the nation’s prosperity.

Amanda Bishop, Biola University

I am the External Affairs intern at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). AEI is a policy think tank that aims to produce the best scholarly work on a variety of issues. Our scholars’ work is published for policymakers and the public to read. My job is to assist in promoting the work put out by AEI scholars and maintaining connections with the public. So… what does that look like on a daily basis? Well, it depends. Some days, I sit in front of a computer screen for 5 or 6 hours, updating a database of contact information. Last week, I went to C-PAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference, where I got to give out books written by AEI scholars and hear speakers like the Former Ambassador to the UN. Sometimes, things get really exciting. For instance, a few weeks back I found myself shaking Newt Gingrich’s hand in a meeting of less than 20 people where I was taking notes. The week after that, I sat in on a presentation about the struggle for freedom in Iraq and afterward said hello the the Iraqi Ambassador.  And instead of being asked to fetch coffee, the AEI provides a fresh carafe of Seattle’s Best for staff and interns every few hours.

One Month in D.C. {Spring 2015}

ASP students have finished their second week of internships and track work and are celebrating one month of being in Washington. What have they learned in D.C. so far?

Savannah Scherkenback, Azusa Pacific University: (1) When you arrive–walk everywhere during your first week! That’s how you get to know the heartbeat of this city.  (2) One of the best “must do” experiences: grocery shopping on weekends at Eastern Market.  Talk to the people.

Katie Barany, Eastern University: The city is alive and busy, and so am I.  There is always cool stuff happening if you look.

ASP students attended an event at George Washington University with Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg {photo credit: Katie Barany}

ASP students attended an event at George Washington University with Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia {photo credit: Katie Barany}

Timothy Carr, Gordon College: We aren’t in Vermont anymore.

Alberto Sanchez, Fresno Pacific University: I have learned that this city is amazing.  I want to keep learning what it takes to be successful in this city.  My internship is very fun.

Amanda Bishop, Biola University: Lebanese food in DC is delicious (like the “Lebanese Chipotle”).

Biola ASPers joined Biola President Barry Corey on Capitol Hill to meet with Congressman Ed Royce [l-r: Amanda Bishop, President Corey, Congressman Royce, Neakzaad Horriat, Luke Bennett, and Eric Corona] {photo credit: Eric Corona}

Biola ASPers joined Biola President Barry Corey on Capitol Hill to meet with Congressman Ed Royce (CA-39) [l-r: Amanda Bishop, President Corey, Congressman Royce, Neakzaad Horriat, Luke Bennett, and Eric Corona] {photo credit: Amanda Bishop}

Luke Bennett, Biola University: There is no excuse for being bored.  There is always something to do, so go do it.

Charlie Richert, Taylor University: D.C. is a wonderful place, full of energy, growth, and vigor.  At the same time, it is a city full of hurt, poverty, and inequality.

Students hang out in the Dellenback [l-r: Rachel Malcolm (Azusa Pacific University), Shelby Holloway (Trinity Western University), Alexcis Albert (Vanguard University of Southern California), Carolina Alvarado (Taylor University), and Norann Beidas (Whitworth University)]

Students hang out in the Dellenback [l-r: Rachel Malcolm (Azusa Pacific University), Shelby Holloway (Trinity Western University), Alexcis Albert (Vanguard University of Southern California), Carolina Alvarado (Taylor University), and Norann Beidas (Whitworth University)]

Norann Beidas, Whitworth University: I have learned the layout of the city and how I can attend amazing events because of this knowledge.

Alexcis Albert, Vanguard University of Southern California: There are so many kind people in the city that love to discuss anything and everything.  It is so easy to meet cool people like the Mayor of London, and congressional hearings are awesome to see politicians in action.  Come to D.C.–it’s amazing!

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London Mayor Boris Johnson at a Politico event attended by ASP students {photo credit: Norann Beidas}

Eric Corona, Biola University: Here in D.C., it is never proper to merely ride the escalator; you must expeditiously walk.  Escalators are not fast enough.

Jacob Fusek, Southeastern University: Opportunities are everywhere if you keep your eyes open!

Patricia Vazquez Topete, Fresno Pacific University: So far I think I have started to learn how to network at different events and how to reach out to people who have similar interests.

Oscar Martinez is the author of The Beast (Spanish translation for The Immigrants that Don't Matter). On Wednesvday Feb.  12 he won the WOLA and Duke Human Rights Book Award. The Beast talks about the journey that immigrants take from Central America to the U.S. Mexican Border and the dangerous experiences they encounter. At the book award Martinez said that individuals from El Salvador don't just immigrate but they flee their country.

Salvadorean journalist Oscar Martinez receives the WOLA-Duke Human Rights Book Award at an event hosted by the Washington Office on Latin America, where ASPer Patricia Vazquez Topete is interning.  Mr. Martinez is the author of The Beast which chronicles the journey that immigrants take from Central America to the U.S.-Mexican Border and the dangerous experiences they encounter. {photo credit: Patricia Vazquez Topete}

Neakzaad Horriat, Biola University: Everyone is here for a purpose, and if you are here without a purpose, you cannot succeed.  But if you do have a purpose, you will flourish here.

Rachel Malcolm, Azusa Pacific University: I have learned about the interesting dynamic of Washington, D.C.  The poor work and live side by side with the rich.

Carolina Alvarado, Taylor University: Never underestimate the metro system.

Homeless Liaison for Prince George's County speaking at a panel discussion on child homelessness hosted by the Congressional Homelessness Caucus and Senator Patty Murray's office (WA)

Homeless Liaison for Prince George’s County speaking at a panel discussion on child homelessness hosted by the Congressional Homelessness Caucus and Senator Patty Murray’s office (WA) {photo credit: Christina McIntyre}

Tara Tankersley, North Central University: The world is bigger than I thought it was! But very different people living in the same place is a beautiful thing.

Reuben Van Gaalen, Dordt College: Advice from someone at my internship — “Never think like an intern!”

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{photo credit: Katie Barany}