Internship Spotlight I {Fall 2015}

Fall 2015 students just finished the third week of their internships! Three students took a few moments to report on what they’re doing and what they’ve learned.

Jennifer Mayorga, University of Northwestern – St. Paul

Jennifer1I am the Immigration Policy Project Intern at the National Conference of State Legislatures. My internship has offered me an opportunity to reconnect with my first policy love: immigration. Coming from an immigrant family and recognizing all the issues related to our broken immigration system, I knew I had to come to Washington D.C. to learn about and get up to date on what our government is doing. My internship supervisor has allowed me the opportunity to attend a variety of hearings and briefings that expose me to the key players in the immigration debate.

My most recent project didn’t actually have to do with the type of immigration issues I grew up with but with the refugee crisis that has turned into a hot topic in Congress. I spent two weeks researching every website on refugee resettlement and reading reports from a variety of organizations and government offices. My supervisor asked me to create a fact sheet that she could take to informational sessions with legislators and governors. I was intimidated by the caliber of writing I was expected to produce! I had the incredible opportunity to attend the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Syrian Refugee Crisis. I saw my own senators advocate for more refugees and use our state as an example of a welcoming community. I saw my government, my democracy in action that day, and I think that is what has made my internship such a valuable experience for me. The opportunity to research and write and truly understand the barriers we face when creating public policy has been one of the biggest lessons I have learned during my short time at NCSL.

Eric Hensel, Gordon College

Eric1This semester in D.C., I’m interning in the office of Senator Kelly Ayotte of NH. This past summer, I interned in the senator’s state office and absolutely loved it. I definitely made the right decision to intern for her in D.C. There’s something special about the Hill. The atmosphere is intense, fast paced, and invigorating. The other day I was walking through the Capitol and passed John McCain — no big deal. Everywhere you turn, there is someone who has a hand in shaping the policy of the free world. It’s both incredibly intimidating and incredibly exhilarating all at once. I’ve gotten to do some amazing work in the area of defense while in Senator Ayotte’s office. As I’ve spent time preparing for briefings, I’ve found out firsthand not only that congressional staffers are mind-blowingly brilliant, but also that the issues they work on are really interesting!

My favorite moment of my internship so far happened a few days ago. I got a chance, near the end of the day, just to explore the Capitol all by myself. I made my way to the rotunda and found myself all alone. It was intensely quiet, and I was floored by a realization. Here I was, all alone, in the Capitol dome of the United States of America, the most powerful nation on earth. It was beyond amazing to truly take in the rotunda, really examine the paintings, and just marvel at where I was. There’s something intensely beautiful about the quiet Capitol, and I was incredibly fortunate enough to wander into it. That’s the great thing about D.C. and ASP: you’ll stumble into a phenomenal experience right when you weren’t expecting it.

Brandan Wilchcombe, Taylor University

Brandan1I am originally from the Bahamas, and now I live in Indiana and attend Taylor University. I never thought I would actually be here in Washington D.C., interning for the Washington Redskins Business Development and Operations Department, but I am, and it is awesome. At the games, I assist with handing out the field passes, and sometimes I walk the clients down to the field or take them into the tunnel access area. I also shadow my supervisor while he checks the suites. During the Redskins’ season opener against the Dolphins, I got to meet the Governor of Virginia Terry McAuliffe and take a picture with him. When we went into our suite to watch the rest of the game, I met former NBA player Marcus Camby and actor Colton Haynes. Serena Williams was even there! This was a great start to my job, but besides working games, I also have office work. My tasks include entering and updating client information in our CRM, doing research, writing biographies for clients, and reaching out to clients about invitations. While I work, players from the team often walk by! At first it was shocking to see Robert Griffin III walking past, but now it just seems like a normal day. So far my internship has been great. I am really working hard, but there is still more I need to learn before I am done. I am really thankful for my supervisor because he is teaching me a lot. He is very determined and hard-working and does his best to make sure everything is done right.

Besides my internship, I am really enjoying this time working with my team in the Communications track. We are working hard and doing our best to complete our case studies and client work. ASP is a really good program, especially for new experiences and opportunities.

What I’ve Learned So Far {Fall 2015}

Fall 2015 students have been in D.C. for a month! We asked them what they have learned about their new city so far.  Here are a few of their responses.

“The city is a metaphor for life. Everything is constantly and rapidly changing at all times. Being here has helped me to remember how important faith is. Even when we don’t see the next step ahead, have faith.”
— Christine O., Azusa Pacific University

“The city is full of brilliant people who are more than willing to teach you.”
— Eric H., Gordon College

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“There’s more to D.C. than the federal side. The neighborhoods have so much life to them!”
— Danni J., University of Northwestern – St. Paul

“D.C. is a really small town. Everyone seems to know everyone, so a good (or bad) interaction with a person can go a long way.”
— Jason S., Biola University

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“D.C. is a very federal power type of place. It almost puts on a show to a point where it detracts from the real D.C.: neighborhoods, communities, and people.”
— Isaac S., Vanguard University

“D.C. is culturally rich. Everywhere you go, you experience a different culture and can be welcomed in. I experienced so much culture this weekend at the H St. Festival and the Latino Festival on Penn. It’s not just suits and ties here — it’s food, singing, and dancing on Pennsylvania Avenue with strangers.”
–Tori G., Gordon College

12049306_1720344878193791_6075489689274188108_n“It’s important to take the time to enjoy the small things during the hustle and bustle of the busy life.”
— Jodie H., Messiah College

“Life in D.C. is very fast-paced. Everyday you have to be better at what you do, especially at the office/workplace. You will meet nice people and mean people, but you should show respect to all kinds.”
— Brandan W., Taylor University

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Welcome to Fall 2015!

ASP Fall 2015 is off to a great start with students from Azusa Pacific University, Biola University, Gordon College, Judson University, Messiah College, Taylor University, University of Northwestern – St. Paul, Vanguard University of Southern California, Warner Pacific College, Westmont College, and William Jessup University.  Especially exciting this semester is the launch of our new Strategic Communication study track! Internships start week after next, but until then, students are exploring their new home; discussing themes of justice, power and poverty, shalom, and faithful practice; serving their community; and building relationships.

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Introductions via “Three Things”

Trivia night on the roof of the Dellenback Center

Trivia night on the roof of the Dellenback Center

Exploring the city through Bus Day 1

Exploring the city through Bus Day 1

Another group exploring the city through Bus Day 1

Another group exploring the city through Bus Day 1

We love our neighbors at Little Lights Urban Ministries. Each semester ASP students get the Little Lights buildings ready for the school year and sometimes volunteer as tutors.

We love our neighbors at Little Lights Urban Ministries. Each semester, ASP students get the Little Lights buildings ready for the school year and sometimes volunteer as tutors.

With Miss Linda, associate director of Little Lights

With Miss Linda, associate director of Little Lights

Fall 2013 in Review: City Life

Washington, D.C. is about more than just business and government.  The neighborhoods of the District combine with federal Washington to make a city with a unique personality.  When you are eating free lunches at think tanks, attending Nats/Wizards/Capitals games, discovering a favorite local coffee shop, jogging past the Capitol, going on scavenger hunts on the bus, hearing oral arguments at the Supreme Court, getting late-night pies, and applying for a library card at the Library of Congress, life in D.C. is rarely boring.

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ASP attended a baseball game at Nats Park, home to the Washington Nationals.

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ASP internship director Elizabeth Pitts [far right] hosted a late-summer cookout at her home in Alexandria.

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Faculty members Peter Baker and Gerry Hartis with the Fall 2013 students at the biannual ASP Alumni Picnic

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Students took the opportunity to gather on the Mall to hear an address from President Obama on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. [Photo credit: Adam Saxton]

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Adam Saxton (University of Northwestern–St. Paul), Dirk Oudman (Dordt College), Alexander Archuleta (Whitworth University), and Connor Briggs (Gordon College) snapped a picture in front of the U.S. Capitol. [Photo credit: Adam Saxton]

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Saturday afternoon in Old Town Alexandria [Photo credit: Stephanie Grossoehme]

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Living in D.C. means becoming a public transportation pro!

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Anika Janzen (Bethel University) [right] and WJC student Katherine Burgess (Union University) snapped a picture after standing inside the U.S. Capitol building, right outside the Senate chamber, as the government shut down in October.  Read their whole story here.

Fall 2013 in Review: A Trip to the Supreme Court

In November, ASP faculty and students met at 7am, ate some donuts, and headed down the street to hear oral arguments at the Supreme Court.Image

The U.S. Supreme Court on a crisp November morningImage

Students wait in line for tickets: [from left] Andrew Grotelueschen (Trinity International University), Stephanie Grossoehme (Olivet Nazarene University), Shayla Wakumoto (Biola University), and Olivia Workman (Waynesburg University).Image

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Alexander Archuleta (Whitworth University), Connor Briggs (Gordon College), and Adam Saxton (University of Northwestern–St. Paul) leave the Supreme Court.

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Student Stephanie Grossoehme took this picture as we left the hall.